Top Twenty Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy

Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy | Neuropathy Symptoms

Each person’s experience varies depending on their type of Neuropathy, but in general following are the most common Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy:

1) Severe strange pains in your feet, legs, hands and other parts of the body; including “crawling insects” under your skin;

2) Balance is difficult when walking, getting dressed, getting out of bed or whenever you close your eyes;

3) Numbness / heavy / cardboard / heavy cement feeling/ Novocain  feeling in your feet and legs;

4) Tingling or “vibration” like feelings in your feet and hands;

5) Electric shocks starting at the bottom of your feet/foot that shoot up your leg(s) and on almost any part of the body;

6) Bone pain especially in the feet on walking or standing;

7) Painful muscle spasms/cramps;

8) Skin may become painful to touch or loss of the feeling of touch; with Agent Orange skin rash;

9) Burning sensations in your feet and hands;

10) Loss, or lessening, of sensation for hot and cold;

11) Feeling like you are wearing socks when you are not;

12) The feeling you are walking on crumpled socks or stones;

13) Feet feel swollen or large;

14) Difficulty moving your hands or feet;

15) A feeling of clumsiness, tripping (foot drop) or dropping things;

16) Attacks of daily severe exhaustion with strange fatigue;

In more severe case of Peripheral Neuropathy you may also experience the following:

17) Problems with not sweating in lower body with excessive sweating in upper body;

18) Digestive (fullness; alternating diarrhea / constipation) and/or urinary problems (overflow incontinence);

19) Sexual problems (loss of sensation/feeling/moisture);

20) A tightening of your chest with an increased difficulty in breathing and/or swallowing; uncorrectable vision problems.

To learn more see the article on the Symptoms of Neuropathy at:
Symptoms of Neuropathy

To understand the basics of Peripheral Neuropathy visit:
Frequently Asked Questions About Neuropathy

About the Author

LtCol Eugene B Richardson, USA (Retired) BA, MDiv, EdM, MS

Col Richardson has suffered with severe neuropathy for over 45 years. A 27 year military veteran and veteran of the Vietnam War, he was diagnosed with a progressive chronic peripheral neuropathy resulting in severe disability. This diagnosis has been confirmed as due to exposure to Agent Orange. It was not until 2010, 42 years after his exposure to Agent Orange, that his diagnosis was recognized by Veterans Affairs as service connected.

Author Archive Page


  1. Generally thought you covered almost everything with thbe exception of knees and neck/shoulders. Personally I find these particular areas to be the worst first thing. I also find that my wrists often have a burning sensation. Although I am properly not unique, it generally strikes me upon rising. Perhaps you/or another such sufferer can offer a suggestion as to what should be done/taken?

    1. Paul: Yes, neuropathy actually can affect any part of the body outside the brain and central nervous system according to the experts. The reason it shows up in the more distant parts of the body, most times but not all, is explained in the information in the FAQ tab of the website. Your wrists need to be evaluated for an entrapment neuropathy that is commonly referred to as Carpel tunnel syndrome which can be corrected with surgery. Burning sensations are best corrected with a doctor prescribed topical cream and the general formula for this cream is in the article in the NSN TODAY TAB on How is neuropathic pain treated. If you send an e mail to me at we can share perhaps more information. Best to you Gene

  2. I need help. I have been suffering from severe neuropathy since 2004. Even opiate based drugs don’t help much. Lyrica does help a little, but it costs so much as I don’t have good prescription drug coverage. This disease has cost me my career and put a strain on my marriage. Sometimes the only thing I look forward to is death. I want to live to help my wife who has beginning Alzheimers and for my children. But it is so difficult to cope. I really need some help. I and so many others need a cure to stem this health disaster and possibly reverse it. I have every symptom above you have listed. It is so maddening, I don’t even know what to say. Sorry, for my rambling, but the only thing that helps me is my faith in Jesus Christ and that one day there will be no more tears.

    1. Lee: God bless. I fully understand. Our faith sustains us in times like these. If you have not done so already, would you please send me an email at so that I can give you some detailed specific guidance and information on neuropathy etc…. It is the best way for me to communicate with you. God bless and be with you and your wife. Gene

  3. Lt.Col. Eugene B. Richardson (USA)Retired. Dear Sir, I am also retired, however I did not think I would suffer pain like I do. I have had an M.D. diagnose the possibility of PMR. I am sure you are well aware of the pain associated with this particular disease, however I too take Lyrica 75mg and am a little unsure of its value. I also take Prednisolone 5mg which may not be enough to assist with the reduction of pain. Incidentally, I am diabetic as well! As I have always been physically, and mentally, very strong, I have also kept myself reasonable fit and eat the right foods, I think, any assistance you can offer would be gratefully accepted.

    1. Paul: Please send an e mail to me with the above information at as it is easier for me to give you lots of help and information. Are you retired military veteran of Vietnam or Korea exposed to Agent Orange? Let me know. Send me an e mail. Col Gene

    2. I got PMR from taking Simvastatin. I had pain and weakness in my arms and legs. A rheumatologist put me on 15 Mg. of Prednisone for almost a year which did get rid of the PMR. I also suffer from neuropathy and my feet and lower legs are becoming more numb over time. I have seen neurologists, but it seems they only want to give me conduction tests. [I am not a diabetic].

  4. Hello. Recently diagnosed. UK based. Not in pain as such, just occasional shooting pain, but very very itchy. After trying anti depressents to supress symptoms, have opted not to take medication as side effects worse than symptoms. Itching gets worse at night amd I find that if I keep my ‘brain busy’ itchng lessens. Anyone got any practical tips on coping with itching? I am trying capsicum cream but itching is random so I can’t really cover my whole body every night! I’ve also purchased some E45 cream to try and lessen damage to my skin when I scratch with my nails, as I can’t use my scratching stick, which is gentler on my skin, everywhere!

    1. NMT: Itching especially if random and all over the body can be a real challenge to stop. I am assuming that you are seeing a neuromuscular neurologist to get at the cause of your neuropathy? You might want to try a cool (not cold) or even warm bath (not hot) before bed each night to CALM the nerves. And yes, the reason it is worse at night is because the brain is not busy…. and you might try playing soothing music or listening to the sounds that you can purchase like a fountain or running water to see if that helps also…. just play softly in the background. I will send this response by E mail.

  5. Dear Sir.

    I have been dealing with Peripheral Neuropathy for six years. It started out as little tingling in my feet. Over the years it has become severe. This has moved up to my thighs, arms, hands, face and numbness in my feet and legs. I struggle daily with life activities by driving, putting my clothes on, working my daily job. I sit at a desk for 8 hours. It bothers me to sit, stand for even short periods. I use to be a very active person. I did have major back sugery and this is when all this started. The doctor has put me on short term disability but my insurance company is giving me a hard time now. They say they are not going to pay me now. I have to be paid so this is causing me to go back to work. I’m on all kinds of medicine to help with the neuropathy which only helps a little. Any advice for help would be great. So many people just doesn’t understand this disease.


    1. Vanessa: I fought the same battle, but there is a way to fight them with affidavits that may help you win. The important point is not to give up. Have you seen a Neuromuscular Neurologist? I would apply for social security disability at the same time. I am unsure if this is all due to your back. Will send you an e mail …. this is the best way to correspond as I am on e mail daily. Just delayed a bit by a concussion from a terrible auto crash on Dec 20th… something about when it rains it pours!

  6. I was diagnosed with idiopathic peripheral neuropathy about a year and a half ago. My disease began with tickly runs in my feet. One month later it had crawled up my legs and from my hands up my arms. I had the crawly prickly feeling all over my body within 6 weeks., I could not function at work or socialize with friends. I saw my internist who gave me the diagnosis but referred me to a neurologist who ran a battery of tests but concluded the same diagnosis. Upon request for a second opinion I was referred to a local neuro muscular physician (sorry forgot exactly what his specialty was). He did a battery of additional tests (not covered by Medicare) and found nothing. My mother passed 6 months before the onset of this disease. We were very close and she named me as executor of her estate. This was completely unexpected since I am the youngest of 5. Mother passed and I became executor an hour later. The stress was overwhelming. I had never felt that before, I felt like an elephant was on my chest. This lasted for one day and then returned on day three. I saw a cardiologist the next week who ran many tests which came back normal. I have wondered if the onset of my neuropathy could have related to the overwhelming stress. I have two sisters who were problems all the way until the estate was closed. I started with 300 mg of Gabapentin and now take 600 mg 3 X daily. My house is being remodeled and I have been on my feet more than usual. My symptoms all over my body are returning but they are more severe. The bones in my feet hurt so badly and the bottoms burn when I walk on them or even have on a shoe. I really do not know where to turn for help. I was told by two physicians that cumulative use of Botox injections could begin the onset of the disease. I have used Botox for 20 years. I stopped them over a year ago. Is there any correlation between the two? I was told there is research being done about this but I have not been able to find anything. I have also been on Valacyclovir HCl 500 mg for 15 years. I am so frustrated with a disease that seems so vague. I don’t care where I have to travel or who I need to see or what tests I need done,. I just need some help. Can you help me?

    1. I will reply by E mail directly to you. Sorry but I have no way of omitting your last name … I can only edit text from the message. If you want your post to be private… sort of … send me an E mail at

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